Kitchen Tool Helps Cut the Added Fat and Calories

Portion control with fat can be an important part of weight management since fat is very high in calories.  For example, a teaspoon of oil or a teaspoon of butter is approximately 50 calories.  While olive oil, canola oil and peanut oil are much better for heart health then butter is, they are just as high in calories. One cooking tool that I find to be very helpful with portion control is th...
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Foods That Improve/Prevent High Blood Pressure

When people think about dietary changes to improve blood pressure, the first, and often the only thing that comes to mind is reducing sodium (salt) intakes.  While reducing sodium intakes to the recommended level (~1,500-2,400 mg/day) does play a major role in improving blood pressure, there are other dietary changes that often get overlooked.  So today, I will focus on which foods to include to...
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A New Cookbook May Help Sneak Veggies into Family-Favorite Dishes

Most adults in America aren’t eating the recommended 5 servings of fruits and vegetables and most kids are eating even less.  Needless to say, fruits and vegetables are truly natures’ “superfoods” that are packed with vitamins and minerals which are essential for overall health and they aid in the growth and development of children. Many parents complain that their children (and even s...
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My Top Cereal Picks

When you walk down the cereal aisle in the grocery store it can feel completely overwhelming because there are so many choices.  To make things more confusing, things that appear healthy at first glance (like raisin bran, granola, etc.) are often loaded with added sugar and are high in calories when actually read the label.  To help, I have come up with some of my top picks which all have a “w...
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Most Americans Are Overeating Sugar, Are You?

I have written several times about the importance of limiting added sugars in the diet, and this month another article came out in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, once again confirming these recommendations.  “Added sugars” are defined as the sugar used in processed and prepared foods (i.e. sodas, cakes, ice cream) and the sugar added to foods at the table or eaten separatel...
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The Burgers that Bulge the Belly

During the summer, hamburgers and hot dogs are popular menu items.  However, grilling burgers at home may be easier on your waistline and wallet because portions in restaurants keep on growing.  In fact, there is now a burger that has a whopping 1,750 calories and over 5,000 mg of sodium!  Watch the following clip from the Today Show to see some of the worst burger options in restaurants, and l...
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Decrease Fat to Decrease Calories

Whether you are trying to reduce your risk of heart disease, lower cholesterol or lose weight, decreasing dietary fat is often recommended.   If you are trying to improve or maintain heart health, the type of fat you are eating is often as important as the amount of fat you are eating.  (See my post titled “Not all Fats are Created Equal” for more information about the different types of fa...
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Fast Food: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Today, I’m following up with last week’s post to provide a list of some of the better options at fast food restaurants.  See the chart below for some meal ideas that are about 550 calories or less (The Do's Column).  Also listed are some meals to watch out for that are loaded with fat and calories (The Don'ts Column).   Breakfast Sample Menus Do’s Don’ts Egg McMuf...
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One Fish, Two Fish…How Much is Too Much?

  We often hear about the health benefits of fish, but then we also hear that fish contains mercury.  This leaves many people wondering is fish good for you and how much is safe?  Mercury occurs naturally in the environment and it also comes from industrial pollution.  This mercury accumulates in water, turns into methylmercury and then is absorbed by fish.  Over time, these mercury lev...
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American Children are Deficient in Vitamin D

Topping the health news today was another study that found that many Americans are not getting enough Vitamin D.  This is not a new finding.  In fact, I wrote on this very topic two times before (see my posts on "Vitamin D & Bone Health" and "Today Show Talks about Vitamin D").  The interesting thing about this study is that it was done on children, and it found that 70% of children are not...
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